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A lesson from Nepal.

October 31, 2019

(I originally posted this on my Instagram two months ago. Finally trying to be more active on this blog, so re-posting)

I just finished a week of studying with an obscure sect of Buddhist monks. They’re the mystics of their tradition.

Every religion’s got mystics. They’re the crazy ones. Those who want to bypass dogma and bang on the very nature of reality itself.

They don’t want to be told about God, they don’t want to understand God, they want to intimately experience God.

This particular group has spent over a thousand years honing the practice of awakening. A process where the illusions of the mind disappear and all that is left is what is real.

Truth be told, I didn’t come here to awaken. I just wanted to be better. If you were to define me, I think that would be it.

Even if I planned to die tomorrow, I would still somehow work today on being a better version of me.

And what better way to be better than to work on your mind? It’s where it all starts. It’s where it all ends.

But…I got to taste it, this awakening. In the last two days, for brief stretches in focused meditation, I experienced a smidgen of what it was about.

Here’s what it’s like. The mind is the clouds. When they part – and you cannot force it, it’s more of an understanding, and then allowing – what is left is the mountains. They were always there. Limitless and timeless.

You experience this. But it is not you. It wasn’t Kamal who experienced it, because he is the clouds, it was like mountains experiencing themselves.

As the clouds eventually appeared again, I saw Kamal – it wasn’t a seeing you do with the eyes, it wasn’t even a feeling, it was an all-knowing. A natural love arose within.

Look, I’m already rather fond of this guy. One heck of a special human being. But it wasn’t that, it was an instantaneous recognition. And I felt compassion for him. Such sweet compassion. For his triumphs. For his suffering. For all that he is.

That’s what was left when I briefly disappeared into the truth behind it all. Love, and most of all, compassion.

5 Comments leave one →
  1. christine esenther permalink
    October 31, 2019 1:54 pm

    So nice to hear from you again! I love the taste of oneness you expressed. Yes you don’t know me but your writing is so personal it makes me feel like I know your soul.

    Many years ago my mother told me that the Dalai Lama is really lovely; she’d just heard him speak. But as a fervent Catholic she was saddened that he was going to go to hell for not believing in God. Then she asked me about my guru (something we’d never spoken about before), Did he believe in God? For once the answer was there, I told her:
    He says that sometimes believing in God gets in the way of experiencing God.

  2. October 31, 2019 6:44 pm

    You are the mountain 💗

  3. Laura permalink
    November 1, 2019 1:52 am

    Sounds like a wonderful experience and along the lines of The Three Principles. Check out the legacy of Sydney Banks if you haven’t already, lovely stuff.

  4. November 1, 2019 5:04 am

    Hey man, welcome back! So glad to see you’re posting again.

    Well done for making it all the way to Nepal in your quest to better yourself.
    It looks beautiful and I’d definitely like to make it out there someday soon.

    Thanks for sharing your experience. A beautiful moment for sure.

    It reminded me of Maslow’s ‘peak experiences’.
    I was lucky enough to have a few of those sometime back and I can just about get a sense of what you have conveyed.

    But life has become far too hectic for that sort of thing now. And I’m the one who’s allowed it to get that way.

    I came here in an attempt to fix that (I saw the email earlier and thought I’d check it out) and it was just what I needed! Thank you.

  5. November 1, 2019 5:04 am

    Hey man, welcome back! So glad to see you’re posting again.

    Well done for making it all the way to Nepal in your quest to better yourself.
    It looks beautiful and I’d definitely like to make it out there someday soon.

    Thanks for sharing your experience. A beautiful moment for sure.

    It reminded me of Maslow’s ‘peak experiences’.
    I was lucky enough to have a few of those sometime back and I can just about get a sense of what you have conveyed.

    But life has become far too hectic for that sort of thing now. And I’m the one who’s allowed it to get that way.

    I came here in an attempt to fix that (I saw the email earlier and thought I’d check it out) and it was just what I needed! Thank you.

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